Five Cs of Credit

In determining a client’s overall credit risk with respect to obtaining mortgage financing, First Foundation endeavors to seek out clients that demonstrate a history of strength and stability with respect to the Five Cs of Credit. This is done for your protection – to ensure that you don’t obtain financing that you will have difficulty repaying – as well as the protection of our lender partners.

1. Character

Will the client be willing to repay the loan? Does the client have a sense of responsibility for his/her obligations?How has this sense of responsibility been demonstrated?

2. Capacity

Will the client be able to repay the loan? What are the financial circumstances of the client? Has the client thought about or reviewed their budget to determine his/her ability to repay the loan? Are sources other than employment income depended upon to make these payments and are these sources stable?

3. Collateral (i.e. down payment or equity)

Collateral may make the loan safe, but not necessarily sound. Provides incentive for client to repay the loan. Provides a means of at least partial recovery if a loan defaults. Collateral should not be considered as a source of repayment.

4. Capital

Provides a cushion for repayment in the event of the client having a financial setback. Indicates an ability and willingness of the client to save and accumulate assets. Confirms that the borrower manages his/her financial affairs adequately and within his/her income. Lack of accumulated worth could be a danger signal unless the applicant is fairly young.

5. Credit

Represents accumulated experience of the client’s habits in performing credit obligations. Provides a record of past credit experience. If there is a problem, a full and satisfactory explanation should be received.

If you have any questions about your credit worthiness, or if you would like to go through the pre-approval process, contact us today or fill out our handy online mortgage application!

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Last updated Nov 19, 2014